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caffeinatedfeminist:

aimez-la-vie:

wearethe99percent:

When I was 17, I chose to attend an affordable state school in a village close to home even though I had been accepted to 2 “Ivy’s” and many of my friend were attending prestigious Universities around the country. My parents, who worked blue collar jobs, could not provide much support for my education so I chose state school knowing that I would have to pay the debt in full. I worked two jobs through college to make ends meet and networked constantly my junior and senior year to try to find work after school. The Monday after graduating with my “useless” communications degree, I started as an intern in IT at a local college, making minimum wage  doing work that was not related to major, but work nonetheless. After a year of showing up on time and doing my job, they hired me full time and I was awarded affordable health benefits and a retirement fund. Two years and no raises later, they offered to pay for my MBA through their program at the business school. In 2010, I bought my first car, a new toyota corolla with money that I’d saved for almost 5 years. In 2011, I bought my first house on my own after living on my own since college in a shared apartment — a $72K, 1 bedroom condo with mortgage payments that were affordable, even with my low income. Shortly after, I finished my MBA and I was promoted into a higher paying job that allowed me to make larger payments against my debt while continuing to live a modest life. I do not live with a great deal of luxury, but my life is the result of constant forethought and planning to secure comfortable means to live by. I do not now, nor have I ever relied on anyone else to pay my way through life.

Sometimes I wish I could be this person. That I went to an affordable college. But you know what? I love my school. I would never be the person that I am now without it. I wouldn’t be interested in genocide studies without it. I wouldn’t want to go to Bosnia. There is no monetary comparison. Some day I will make something of myself. And I fully own up to the choices I’ve made. Its not for everyone. And I applaud those that made wiser choices, that’s for sure.

That’s nice and all, but how about the large percentage of people who LITERALLY CANNOT LAND A JOB IN THIS ECONOMY?!
Your privilege is showing, OP.

All of the above commentary PLUS fuck the notion that an Ivy League education is a luxury item. If you had any mental energy for anything besides holding yourself about others, you would find it outrageous that in spite of getting accepted into elite schools, you had to forgo enrolling, while rich kids with crap grades got in because their parents are alums, and tuition wasn’t an issue. That is where the oppression started for you. Your whole decision making process has revolved around what you can afford while some people have so goddamn much money they have to parade their wealth around (in the form of clothes, cars and houses) just to alleviate the boredom that comes from not having to work. They send their lazy ass kids to the schools they went to, where they scrape by and are bored by the whole thing. A Yale education was wasted on a man who didn’t think the French had a word for “entrepreneur” for fuck’s sake. If that doesn’t scream that there are two Americas, I can only conclude that you majored in La-La-La Can’t Hear You Studies.

caffeinatedfeminist:

aimez-la-vie:

wearethe99percent:

When I was 17, I chose to attend an affordable state school in a village close to home even though I had been accepted to 2 “Ivy’s” and many of my friend were attending prestigious Universities around the country. My parents, who worked blue collar jobs, could not provide much support for my education so I chose state school knowing that I would have to pay the debt in full. I worked two jobs through college to make ends meet and networked constantly my junior and senior year to try to find work after school. The Monday after graduating with my “useless” communications degree, I started as an intern in IT at a local college, making minimum wage  doing work that was not related to major, but work nonetheless. After a year of showing up on time and doing my job, they hired me full time and I was awarded affordable health benefits and a retirement fund. Two years and no raises later, they offered to pay for my MBA through their program at the business school. In 2010, I bought my first car, a new toyota corolla with money that I’d saved for almost 5 years. In 2011, I bought my first house on my own after living on my own since college in a shared apartment — a $72K, 1 bedroom condo with mortgage payments that were affordable, even with my low income. Shortly after, I finished my MBA and I was promoted into a higher paying job that allowed me to make larger payments against my debt while continuing to live a modest life. I do not live with a great deal of luxury, but my life is the result of constant forethought and planning to secure comfortable means to live by. I do not now, nor have I ever relied on anyone else to pay my way through life.

Sometimes I wish I could be this person. That I went to an affordable college. But you know what? I love my school. I would never be the person that I am now without it. I wouldn’t be interested in genocide studies without it. I wouldn’t want to go to Bosnia. There is no monetary comparison. Some day I will make something of myself. And I fully own up to the choices I’ve made. Its not for everyone. And I applaud those that made wiser choices, that’s for sure.

That’s nice and all, but how about the large percentage of people who LITERALLY CANNOT LAND A JOB IN THIS ECONOMY?!

Your privilege is showing, OP.

All of the above commentary PLUS fuck the notion that an Ivy League education is a luxury item. If you had any mental energy for anything besides holding yourself about others, you would find it outrageous that in spite of getting accepted into elite schools, you had to forgo enrolling, while rich kids with crap grades got in because their parents are alums, and tuition wasn’t an issue. That is where the oppression started for you. Your whole decision making process has revolved around what you can afford while some people have so goddamn much money they have to parade their wealth around (in the form of clothes, cars and houses) just to alleviate the boredom that comes from not having to work. They send their lazy ass kids to the schools they went to, where they scrape by and are bored by the whole thing. A Yale education was wasted on a man who didn’t think the French had a word for “entrepreneur” for fuck’s sake. If that doesn’t scream that there are two Americas, I can only conclude that you majored in La-La-La Can’t Hear You Studies.

  1. lincoln-mobile-marketing reblogged this from wearethe99percent
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  6. abigator-elf reblogged this from wearethe99percent and added:
    EXACTLY!! THIS IS HOW YOU ARE SUPPOSED TO LIVE!
  7. cluelesszombies reblogged this from wearethe99percent and added:
    Keep working hard. You’re one of the good ones.
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  14. teacherdee reblogged this from caffeinatedfeminist and added:
    All of the above commentary PLUS fuck the notion that an Ivy League education is a luxury item. If you had any mental...
  15. my-racing-thoughts reblogged this from keepmyoceanscalm
  16. bright-and-erly reblogged this from queerartisticnotions
  17. keepmyoceanscalm reblogged this from queerartisticnotions and added:
    i believe in this so, so much. happiness > everything. this is so inspiring, dooood
  18. private-revolution reblogged this from caffeinatedfeminist and added:
    *Deep breaths* Okay OP, I appreciate the fact that you’re part of a small percentage of people in this country who are...
  19. Candie submitted this to wearethe99percent
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